My name is Angus Lamont, a fellow Formby fan from Glasgow. I’ve been playing the ukulele and listening to George ever since 2011 when Frank Skinner’s documentary premiered on BBC4. Looking back after 5 years or so, it has really changed my life, and generated lots of friendships within the Formby/ukulele world. I have here some examples of my colourisation work that I have created in Photoshop. I have been colourising images now for about 5 years, attempting to bring original black and white images to life, with subjects ranging from classic films to music artists. Of course nothing will beat the original image, but I find it interesting to see what it could have looked like in colour. In George’s case, there is not a lot of colour image material out there (that I am aware of anyway), so I thought it would be a nice idea to use him as a subject. It has taken a while to get the technique right, and I must credit my good friend and fellow GFS member, Steve MacEwan for his fantastic tutorials on the process (definitely worth checking out!). Creativity is my strongest skill- set, and combining that with my admiration for George and the ukulele has proved to be a great success. I also have planned (but currently on hold) a short film about George using stop motion animation. Making a film is quite a daunting process, but its something I’d definitely like to see finished in the near future (we haven’t had a Formby film since 1946, so I think it’s about time!). In the meantime, I hope to see you all at the conventions! Angus Lamont October 2017
Adding a little colour to our lives
When I first joined the George Formby Society in 1991, the only thing I really wanted to do was to look at photographs of Mr Formby and of course listen to much more of his music. Although George (probably because of the characters he played in his films), was usually described as “a bit gormless,” I have (to this day), always thought  that he was totally photogenic and of iconic proportions. In my early days in the GFS the magazine was completely a black and white issue. Then in the Winter issue of 1994, new editor Dennis Taylor took the Vellum in to unknown areas of expectation with the first glossy magazine which contained colour images. Twenty three years later we are still enjoying a colour issue with enthusiastic attempts (I had a few cracks at it myself but could never achieve the quality that Angus gets) at colouring George on most every cover since then, from various members. Now there is a new kid on the block and surely the talent of Angus Lamont will not go unnoticed for much longer. I take the greatest pleasure in highlighting some of Angus’s work on this page. I will let Angus introduce himself in the words below. PP
The Colourful World of Angus Lamont
Angus has a great interest in classic films and film stars from the golden age of cinema. Above is a selection of his work, featured on his Colourised Photo page on Facebook. Please click an image to view.
In my early days in the GFS the magazine was completely a black and white issue. Then in the Winter issue of 1994, new editor Dennis Taylor took the Vellum in to unknown areas of expectation with the first glossy magazine which contained colour images. Twenty three years later we are still enjoying a colour issue with enthusiastic attempts (I had a few cracks at it myself but could never achieve the quality that Angus gets) at colouring George on most every cover since then, from various members. Now there is a new kid on the block and surely the talent of Angus Lamont will not go unnoticed for much longer. I take the greatest pleasure in highlighting some of Angus’s work on this page. I will let Angus introduce himself in the words below. PP My name is Angus Lamont, a fellow Formby fan from Glasgow. I’ve been playing the ukulele and listening to George ever since 2011 when Frank Skinner’s documentary premiered on BBC4. Looking back after 5 years or so, it has really changed my life, and generated lots of friendships within the Formby/ukulele world. I have here some examples of my colourisation work that I have created in Photoshop. I have been colourising images now for about 5 years, attempting to bring original black and white images to life, with subjects ranging from classic films to music artists. Of course nothing will beat the original image, but I find it interesting to see what it could have looked like in colour. In George’s case, there is not a lot of colour image material out there (that I am aware of anyway), so I thought it would be a nice idea to use him as a subject. It has taken a while to get the technique right, and I must credit my good friend and fellow GFS member, Steve MacEwan for his fantastic tutorials on the process (definitely worth checking out!). Creativity is my strongest skill-set, and combining that with my admiration for George and the ukulele has proved to be a great success. I also have planned (but currently on hold) a short film about George using stop motion animation. Making a film is quite a daunting process, but its something I’d definitely like to see finished in the near future (we haven’t had a Formby film since 1946, so I think it’s about time!). In the meantime, I hope to see you all at the conventions! Angus Lamont October 2017
Adding a little colour to our lives
When I first joined the George Formby Society in 1991, the only thing I really wanted to do was to look at photographs of Mr Formby and of course listen to much more of his music. Although George (probably because of the characters he played in his films), was usually described as “a bit gormless,” I have (to this day), always thought  that he was totally photogenic and of iconic proportions.
The Colourful World of Angus Lamont
Angus has a great interest in classic films and film stars from the golden age of cinema. Above is a selection of his work, featured on his Colourised Photo page on Facebook. Please click an image to view.