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George is inducted into American Banjo Museum
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Although some of his films were released in the USA, George never performed on American soil. Legend has it that he turned down an invitation to play Carnegie Hall, and it was probably his 'Lancashireness' that led him to believe he wouldn't be popular in the States. All the more testament to his enduring appeal therefore, that George was honoured by the American Banjo Museum on September 9th when they inducted him into their Hall of Fame at an award ceremony in Downtown Oklahoma City. George was given the honour for his historic importance in popularising the ukulele-banjo, and in a packed function room at the top of a 50-storey skyscraper with views that would put Blackpool Tower to shame, a mini video documentary presented George's life to the assembled banjo players and enthusiasts who had come from all corners of the US. The video, which had been compiled with assistance from Peter Pollard and Lewis Clifton, was heartily applauded by all present and then Andy Eastwood, who had been flown over from Britain especially for the event, took to the stage and performed Leaning On A Lamp-Post, complete with the usual blistering uke solo, backed by Florida pianist Randy Morris. The audience, many of whom were aware of Formby but had not had the pleasure of seeing his style performed live before, were enraptured, and applause engulfed the room before the song was even over. The icing on the cake was when George's niece Gina Hequembourg (Ella Formby's daughter) made a touching speech on behalf of the Formby family and accepted a magnificent bronze award in the shape of a banjoist. The following day the celebrations continued at the Hudiburg- Chevrolet Theater in Midwest City, where a concert was held featuring various popular performers from the banjo world, and Andy Eastwood had the honour of closing the show with a 25 minute banjo- uke set. Our heartfelt thanks go to Johnny Baier and all his team at the superb American Banjo Museum for honouring our George and helping keep his memory alive across the Pond
The American Banjo Museum The American Banjo Museum Andy Eastwood Andy Eastwood
honoured in usa HOME HOME A - Z A - Z
Although some of his films were released in the USA, George never performed on American soil. Legend has it that he turned down an invitation to play Carnegie Hall, and it was probably his 'Lancashireness' that led him to believe he wouldn't be popular in the States. All the more testament to his enduring appeal therefore, that George was honoured by the American Banjo Museum on September 9th when they inducted him into their Hall of Fame at an award ceremony in Downtown Oklahoma City. George was given the honour for his historic importance in popularising the ukulele-banjo, and in a packed function room at the top of a 50-storey skyscraper with views that would put Blackpool Tower to shame, a mini video documentary presented George's life to the assembled banjo players and enthusiasts who had come from all corners of the US. The video, which had been compiled with assistance from Peter Pollard and Lewis Clifton, was heartily applauded by all present and then Andy Eastwood, who had been flown over from Britain especially for the event, took to the stage and performed Leaning On A Lamp-Post, complete with the usual blistering uke solo, backed by Florida pianist Randy Morris. The audience, many of whom were aware of Formby but had not had the pleasure of seeing his style performed live before, were enraptured, and applause engulfed the room before the song was even over. The icing on the cake was when George's niece Gina Hequembourg (Ella Formby's daughter) made a touching speech on behalf of the Formby family and accepted a magnificent bronze award in the shape of a banjoist. The following day the celebrations continued at the Hudiburg- Chevrolet Theater in Midwest City, where a concert was held featuring various popular performers from the banjo world, and Andy Eastwood had the honour of closing the show with a 25 minute banjo- uke set. Our heartfelt thanks go to Johnny Baier and all his team at the superb American Banjo Museum for honouring our George and helping keep his memory alive across the Pond
The American Banjo Museum The American Banjo Museum Andy Eastwood Andy Eastwood
Inducted into Banjo Museum