In the year 1938 you could say that George Formby had reached the pinnacle of his career. His best known songs, Blackpool Rock, Windows, Lampost, Chinese Blues and My Ukulele were already on disc and in people’s record collections, although some classics like Auntie Maggie and Wigan Boat Express were still to come. He had just completed his eighth film, It’s In the Air. I See Ice was issued in the same year and his recordings numbered over twenty in the year as well. He was appearing regularly in concerts throughout the UK and also featured on radio. Obviously he would feature on BBC at this time but he was also popular on Radio Normandy and Radio Luxembourg - the wonderful Feenamint recordings discovered and restored by GFS member Chris Webster are the best example of George and Beryl and are available in the GFS Shop.
radio in 1938
George stars in radio

A LANCASHIRE LAD IN LONDON

The other BBC radio series was A Lancashire Lad In London.

This was a six-episode one-off series and first broadcast

on 07 January 1938 on the National Programme, Daventry.

The all the six episodes were named, in order of

transmission here were:

The Honeymooners Arrive

Written by Howard Thomas

This is the first of six sketches by Howard Thomas that are to

give listeners the opportunity of hearing George Formby in a

series of adventures.

The Lancashire lad is a local boy from Posselthwaite - an

imaginary place which Thomas made familiar to listeners in

his radio play Beauty Queen broadcast in March.

The series followed on with the same cast and the episodes

being named,

Friday 14th January 1938 - On A Thames pleasure Steamer

Friday 21st January 1938 - The Night Club

Friday 28th January 1938 - The Tower of London

Friday 4th February 1938 - In Hyde Park

Friday 14th February 1938 - At The Waxworks

George Formby by Max Kestor The popular Lancashire comedian will be heard in a new weekly series of radio sketches starting next Friday. Starting next Friday, January 7, listeners will be introduced to a new weekly radio feature written by Howard Thomas. This will be called, ‘A Lancashire Lad in London’. The choice of George Formby as the Lancashire Lad is inevitable. No one is more thoroughly Lancashire, either on or off stage, than George, and the adventures of the Lancashire Lad and his wife who come to London on their honeymoon should be packed with laughs. And yet if George Formby had been a couple of stones lighter we should never have seen that amiable, rather shambling, wide- mouthed figure on stage, or heard him on the air. When he was seven he was apprenticed to a racing stable. Up at the crack of dawn, taking the string out across the moors, cleaning his horse down, and preparing the second string – it was hard work. And even harder when he was transferred to Johnny Burns’s stable in Ireland. He ran away once or twice but never managed to get back to England until 1919. it was then that the scales were literally turned in his favour. He put on weight and by 1921 was too heavy to ride. Now his father, the immortal George Formby (Coughing better tonight aren’t I?), had always set his face against young George going on the stage. In fact, George tells me that he never saw his father’s performance in his life. Whenever he went to the stage door, he was politely but firmly pushed out. ‘One fool in the family’s enough’, said his dad. But the same year (1921) his father died. Although the family was comfortably off, young George came to London to look for work. On stage at the Victoria Palace he saw a comedian working his father’s material. ‘Nay, dash it all, if he can get away with that, so can I’, thought George. So he went to Birkenhead with a few songs and some patter of his father’s, carefully studied from gramophone records. But though he used his father’s type of material, he took his mother’s maiden name and he appeared as George hoy. ‘If I’m going to be a flop, I won’t be a flop under the name of Formby’, he said. But eighteen months later he topped the bill, and the week following there was another George Formby on the stage. From then on it was a steady climb to success. A contract for five years in touring revue, hos own road show, in 1936 his first film (with Basil Dean), and every year, pantomime, generally Idle Jack in Dick Whittington. The height of his fame was reached when on November 15, 1937, he stood on the stage of the Palladium where his father had stood twice before for a Command Performance before his Majesties the King and Queen – the only instance of a father and son achieving the same feat. This Lancashire Lad, (he was even born in Wigan, that gift to the comics) lives a modest, simple life. He works like a Trojan and keeps remarkably fit by riding when ever he can. Last year on his holidays he went to Matt Peacock’s stables at Middleham and returned to his apprentice days. He has two hobbies - cars and radio. Starting with a motor-bike, on which he used to tour from town to town, he has had forty eight cars in the last ten years. Don’t think he smashes them up. He just likes a change. And for radio, guests at his house in Scorton, near Blackpool, don’t get much sleep. George is ether-searching, chiefly for dance music, till five o’clock in the morning. But he still appears as fresh as a daisy on the stage and audiences roar with delight when they hear ‘Chinese Laundry Blues’ and the stumming of his ukulele, which by the way, he first played on stage as a result of a shilling bet. He is so busy that ‘Lancashire Lad in London’ will be on at 6.25 every Friday, and after the first one he will rush off to delight the children if Newcastle as Idle Jack. If you’ve ever heard the roar of ‘O.K. Jack’ that goes up from the little voices when he comes on stage with his ‘How are you, kids?’ you’d have no doubt about the popularity of this Lancashire Lad, both in London and out. Max Kestor - Radio Times - January 1938

A FORMBY DO!

A Fomby Do! - Come and muck in! George Formby will positively preside (by permission of George Black) Beryl will probably interrupt Harry Leader and his Band will definitely be. in attendance Don't miss A Formby Do!
GEORGE BIDS FAREWELL AT THE END OF A FORMBY DO EPISODE
Grateful thanks to Chris Webster for this recording.
These recordings are from an early wartime broadcast.

In the year 1938 you could say that George Formby had

reached the pinnacle of his career. His best known songs,

Blackpool Rock, Windows, Lampost, Chinese Blues and My

Ukulele were already on disc and in people’s record

collections, although some classics like Auntie Maggie and

Wigan Boat Express were still to come.

He had just completed his eighth film, It’s In the Air. I See

Ice was issued in the same year and his recordings

numbered over twenty in the year as well.

He was appearing regularly

in concerts throughout the

UK and also featured on

radio. Obviously he would

feature on BBC at this time

but he was also popular on

Radio Normandy and Radio

Luxembourg - the

wonderful Feenamint

recordings discovered and

restored by GFS member

Chris Webster are the best

example of George and

Beryl and are available in

the GFS Shop.

`

A LANCASHIRE LAD IN LONDON

The other BBC radio series was A Lancashire Lad In

London.

This was a six-episode one-off series and first

broadcast

on 07 January 1938 on the National Programme,

Daventry.

The all the six episodes were named, in order of

transmission here were:

The Honeymooners Arrive

Written by Howard Thomas

This is the first of six sketches by Howard Thomas that

are to give listeners the opportunity of hearing George

Formby in a series of adventures.

The Lancashire lad is a local boy from Posselthwaite -

an imaginary place which Thomas made familiar to lis-

teners in his radio play Beauty Queen broadcast in

March.

The series followed on with the same cast and the

episodes being named,

Friday 14th January 1938 - On A Thames pleasure

Steamer

Friday 21st January 1938 - The Night Club

Friday 28th January 1938 - The Tower of London

Friday 4th February 1938 - In Hyde Park

Friday 14th February 1938 - At The Waxworks

A FORMBY DO!

A Fomby Do! - Come and muck in! George Formby will positively preside (by permission of George Black) Beryl will probably interrupt Harry Leader and his Band will definitely be. in attendance Don't miss A Formby Do!
THE RADIO TIMES COVER FOR 02 JANUARY 1938
GEORGE BIDS FAREWELL AT THE END OF A FORMBY DO EPISODE
Grateful thanks to Chris Webster for this recording.
These recordings are from an early wartime broadcast.
radio in 1938
George Formby by Max Kestor The popular Lancashire comedian will be heard in a new weekly series of radio sketches starting next Friday. Starting next Friday, January 7, listeners will be introduced to a new weekly radio feature written by Howard Thomas. This will be called, ‘A Lancashire Lad in London’. The choice of George Formby as the Lancashire Lad is inevitable. No one is more thoroughly Lancashire, either on or off stage, than George, and the adventures of the Lancashire Lad and his wife who come to London on their honeymoon should be packed with laughs. And yet if George Formby had been a couple of stones lighter we should never have seen that amiable, rather shambling, wide- mouthed figure on stage, or heard him on the air. When he was seven he was apprenticed to a racing stable. Up at the crack of dawn, taking the string out across the moors, cleaning his horse down, and preparing the second string – it was hard work. And even harder when he was transferred to Johnny Burns’s stable in Ireland. He ran away once or twice but never managed to get back to England until 1919. it was then that the scales were literally turned in his favour. He put on weight and by 1921 was too heavy to ride. Now his father, the immortal George Formby (Coughing better tonight aren’t I?), had always set his face against young George going on the stage. In fact, George tells me that he never saw his father’s performance in his life. Whenever he went to the stage door, he was politely but firmly pushed out. ‘One fool in the family’s enough’, said his dad. But the same year (1921) his father died. Although the family was comfortably off, young George came to London to look for work. On stage at the Victoria Palace he saw a comedian working his father’s material. ‘Nay, dash it all, if he can get away with that, so can I’, thought George. So he went to Birkenhead with a few songs and some patter of his father’s, carefully studied from gramophone records. But though he used his father’s type of material, he took his mother’s maiden name and he appeared as George hoy. ‘If I’m going to be a flop, I won’t be a flop under the name of Formby’, he said. But eighteen months later he topped the bill, and the week following there was another George Formby on the stage. From then on it was a steady climb to success. A contract for five years in touring revue, hos own road show, in 1936 his first film (with Basil Dean), and every year, pantomime, generally Idle Jack in Dick Whittington. The height of his fame was reached when on November 15, 1937, he stood on the stage of the Palladium where his father had stood twice before for a Command Performance before his Majesties the King and Queen – the only instance of a father and son achieving the same feat. This Lancashire Lad, (he was even born in Wigan, that gift to the comics) lives a modest, simple life. He works like a Trojan and keeps remarkably fit by riding when ever he can. Last year on his holidays he went to Matt Peacock’s stables at Middleham and returned to his apprentice days. He has two hobbies - cars and radio. Starting with a motor-bike, on which he used to tour from town to town, he has had forty eight cars in the last ten years. Don’t think he smashes them up. He just likes a change. And for radio, guests at his house in Scorton, near Blackpool, don’t get much sleep. George is ether- searching, chiefly for dance music, till five o’clock in the morning. But he still appears as fresh as a daisy on the stage and audiences roar with delight when they hear ‘Chinese Laundry Blues’ and the stumming of his ukulele, which by the way, he first played on stage as a result of a shilling bet. He is so busy that ‘Lancashire Lad in London’ will be on at 6.25 every Friday, and after the first one he will rush off to delight the children if Newcastle as Idle Jack. If you’ve ever heard the roar of ‘O.K. Jack’ that goes up from the little voices when he comes on stage with his ‘How are you, kids?’ you’d have no doubt about the popularity of this Lancashire Lad, both in London and out. Max Kestor - Radio Times - January 1938
George stars in radio