Formby on film
Stage struck newcomer to a theatrical boarding house is 'framed' with the murder of an acrobat by the murdered man's ex-partner, who is the real killer. The realistic murder scene earned the film it's 'A' certificate, nevertheless it lacks the usual mobility of a Formby vehicle. Brendan Ryan Leslie Halliwell's Film Guide Murder in a theatrical boarding house, with suspicion pointing to our George. One of the star's last vehicles, not too bad at all, but without the sweet smell of success. I think that Alec Guiness borrowed George's outfit for his film "The Man In The White Suite", it definitely looks better on George though and proves once again that Formby had a special photographic quality that added to his mystique. The kids in 1945 would have suffered severe disappointment if they had turned up at the pictures minus Mum or Dad as they would have been refused admission. The 'A' certificate granted to this film by the powers-that-be meant that no one under the age 16 would be allowed in unless accompanied by an adult. Ludicrous really when you think that the kids had all just come through World War II. The film has a few sinister moments for a change and personally, I feel that none of the Columbia films come anywhere near to the ATP productions. The songs here though are as ever, all top notch and are all still firm favourites in the Society today.. Peter Pollard The plot races along and the laughs come thick and fast, in George's penultimate picture. After a decade of experiences in hit movies, George's confidence and slickness make this one of his finest performances on film; in particular the songs "The Daring Young Man" and "I'd Like A Dream Like That" and George's scene with the psychiatrist stand out as superb moments. George is well supported by an excellent script and a strong cast of genuine variety artists who 'play themselves'. Unfortunately, the release of this film coincided with a temporary lapse in George's popularity. Having made Britain laugh throughout the war years, George was now out of favour (as was Churchill) as people tried to put the war years behind them and look to the future. the film's 'A' certificate also stifled its success somewhat and it received second billing at the cinema, despite being one of George's best Columbia pictures Andy Eastwood
I Didnít Do It
I DIDN'T DO IT Columbia Produced by: Marcel Varnel & Ben Henry Writers: Howard Irving-Young, Stephen Black, Norman Lee, Peter Fraser, Michael Vaughan Photography: Roy Fogwell Director: Marcel Varnel Trade Show: June 12 1945; Released on: July 23 1945 CAST: George Formby, Billy Caryll, Hilda Mundy, Gaston Palmer, Jack Daly, Carl Jaffe, Marjorie Brown, Wally Patch, Ian Fleming, The Boswell Twins. SONGS: She's Got Two Of Everything (Cunningham/Towers) I'd Like A Dream Like That (Formby/Cliffe) The Daring Young Man (Formby/Cliffe)
formby on film
Stage struck newcomer to a theatrical boarding house is 'framed' with the murder of an acrobat by the murdered man's ex-partner, who is the real killer. The realistic murder scene earned the film it's 'A' certificate, nevertheless it lacks the usual mobility of a Formby vehicle. Brendan Ryan Leslie Halliwell's Film Guide Murder in a theatrical boarding house, with suspicion pointing to our George. One of the star's last vehicles, not too bad at all, but without the sweet smell of success. I think that Alec Guiness borrowed George's outfit for his film "The Man In The White Suite", it definitely looks better on George though and proves once again that Formby had a special photographic quality that added to his mystique. The kids in 1945 would have suffered severe disappointment if they had turned up at the pictures minus Mum or Dad as they would have been refused admission. The 'A' certificate granted to this film by the powers-that-be meant that no one under the age 16 would be allowed in unless accompanied by an adult. Ludicrous really when you think that the kids had all just come through World War II. The film has a few sinister moments for a change and personally, I feel that none of the Columbia films come anywhere near to the ATP productions. The songs here though are as ever, all top notch and are all still firm favourites in the Society today.. Peter Pollard The plot races along and the laughs come thick and fast, in George's penultimate picture. After a decade of experiences in hit movies, George's confidence and slickness make this one of his finest performances on film; in particular the songs "The Daring Young Man" and "I'd Like A Dream Like That" and George's scene with the psychiatrist stand out as superb moments. George is well supported by an excellent script and a strong cast of genuine variety artists who 'play themselves'. Unfortunately, the release of this film coincided with a temporary lapse in George's popularity. Having made Britain laugh throughout the war years, George was now out of favour (as was Churchill) as people tried to put the war years behind them and look to the future. the film's 'A' certificate also stifled its success somewhat and it received second billing at the cinema, despite being one of George's best Columbia pictures Andy Eastwood
I Didnít Do It
I DIDN'T DO IT Columbia Produced by: Marcel Varnel & Ben Henry Writers: Howard Irving-Young, Stephen Black, Norman Lee, Peter Fraser, Michael Vaughan Photography: Roy Fogwell Director: Marcel Varnel Trade Show: June 12 1945; Released on: July 23 1945 CAST: George Formby, Billy Caryll, Hilda Mundy, Gaston Palmer, Jack Daly, Carl Jaffe, Marjorie Brown, Wally Patch, Ian Fleming, The Boswell Twins. SONGS: She's Got Two Of Everything (Cunningham/Towers) I'd Like A Dream Like That (Formby/Cliffe) The Daring Young Man (Formby/Cliffe)