Formby on film
Plagued by a domineering mother, newly wed textile mill foreman develops new type of yarn for the manufacture of lingerie, which is modelled successfully by his wife. This film has a much more serious story line than the usual Formby comedy, and there is no slapstick. It is certainly the star's most rounded, straight-forward acting role. Brendan Ryan This is George's last film for the ATP set-up and in it he does a bit of serious acting. And, he's not bad at it either. The action takes place around a textile mill in which our hero develops a revolutionary new cloth. One of the best (and most underrated songs) is "You Can't Go Wrong In These" in which George sells his wares at a fashion show. George has a dragon for a mother-in-law but to make up for this, he also has a lovely wife in Peggy Bryan. George also plays a Dallas uke/banjo in this film as opposed to his usual Abbott, Ludwig or Gibson instruments. George had a contract with the Dallas company and his head was illustrated on the peg-head of the complete range of instruments. Peter Pollard Leslie Halliwell's Film Guide An employee teaches an underwear firm to move with the times. Tolerable star comedy from his late period.
Turned Out Nice Again
TURNED OUT NICE AGAIN Ealing/United Artists Produced by: Michael Balcon Writers: Austin Melford, John Dighton and Basil Deardon From the play, "As You Are" by Hugh Mills and Wells Root Director: Marcel Varnel Trade Show: May 27 1941; Released on: August 4 1941 Cast: George Formby, Peggy Bryan, Edward Chapman, Elliot Makeham, Mackenzie Ward, O. B. Clarence, and Wilfred Hyde White and Michael Rennie in bit parts. SONGS: Auntie Maggies Remedy (Formby/Latta) You Can't Go Wrong In These (MacDougal) The Emperor Of Lancashire (MacDougal) You're Everything To Me (MacDougal)
formby on film
Plagued by a domineering mother, newly wed textile mill foreman develops new type of yarn for the manufacture of lingerie, which is modelled successfully by his wife. This film has a much more serious story line than the usual Formby comedy, and there is no slapstick. It is certainly the star's most rounded, straight-forward acting role. Brendan Ryan This is George's last film for the ATP set- up and in it he does a bit of serious acting. And, he's not bad at it either. The action takes place around a textile mill in which our hero develops a revolutionary new cloth. One of the best (and most underrated songs) is "You Can't Go Wrong In These" in which George sells his wares at a fashion show. George has a dragon for a mother-in-law but to make up for this, he also has a lovely wife in Peggy Bryan. George also plays a Dallas uke/banjo in this film as opposed to his usual Abbott, Ludwig or Gibson instruments. George had a contract with the Dallas company and his head was illustrated on the peg- head of the complete range of instruments. Peter Pollard Leslie Halliwell's Film Guide An employee teaches an underwear firm to move with the times. Tolerable star comedy from his late period.
Turned Out Nice Again
TURNED OUT NICE AGAIN Ealing/United Artists Produced by: Michael Balcon Writers: Austin Melford, John Dighton and Basil Deardon From the play, "As You Are" by Hugh Mills and Wells Root Director: Marcel Varnel Trade Show: May 27 1941; Released on: August 4 1941 Cast: George Formby, Peggy Bryan, Edward Chapman, Elliot Makeham, Mackenzie Ward, O. B. Clarence, and Wilfred Hyde White and Michael Rennie in bit parts. SONGS: Auntie Maggies Remedy (Formby/Latta) You Can't Go Wrong In These (MacDougal) The Emperor Of Lancashire (MacDougal) You're Everything To Me (MacDougal)